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URMC doctors using 3D printing to help patients

Wednesday, December 14, 2016

Two doctors at the University of Rochester are combining their passions and talents with the latest technology -and a little arts and crafts - to create life-like organs.

"We worked together and we were able to create these physical organs that looked real. But they also felt real, as if you were doing a real operation,” said Dr. Jonathan Stone, a neurosurgery resident at University of Rochester.

The process starts with a patient’s CAT scan, which is then created into a 3D model on the computer. The next step is using a 3D printer to create a mold. Hydrogel is injected into the mold, and paint and dye are used to make the organs look real.

Dr. Ahmed Ghazi of the University of Rochester is an Assistant Professor of Urology and the Director of Simulation Training.

Read More: URMC doctors using 3D printing to help patients

URMC physicians use 3D printing to enable surgery rehearsals

Wednesday, November 30, 2016

Physicians at the University of Rochester Medical Centre (URMC) have used 3D printers to develop fabricated artificial organs that can even physically bleed when cut.

These 3D models are said to be incredibly realistic and mimic the real thing. Initially the replicas are to be used to create simulations for training and could soon be widely used to rehearse complex operations.

The artificial human anatomy parts were made as part of a programme which has been named the Simulated Inanimate Model for a Physical Learning Experience, or SIMPLE. It is the brainchild of Ahmed Ghazi, M.D., M.SC., an assistant professor in the Department of Urology and Jonathan Stone, M.D., a Neurosurgery resident who also holds a degree in biomedical engineering.

Read More: URMC physicians use 3D printing to enable surgery rehearsals

Creating the “Model Human” to Practice Surgery

Thursday, November 17, 2016

Physicians at the University of Rochester Medical Center (URMC) have developed a new way to fabricate artificial organs and human anatomy that mimics the real thing, even up to the point of bleeding when cut. These models are able to create highly realistic simulations for training and could soon be widely used to rehearse complex cases prior to surgery.

The program, which the creators have dubbed Simulated Inanimate Model for a Physical Learning Experience, or SIMPLE, is the brainchild of Ahmed Ghazi, M.D., M.Sc., an assistant professor in the Department of Urology, and Jonathan Stone, M.D., a Neurosurgery resident who also holds a degree in biomedical engineering. The process entails converting images obtained from medical scans into computer generated designs and, through the assistance of 3D printing, fabricating lifelike organs that can be poked, prodded, and dissected.

Read More: Creating the “Model Human” to Practice Surgery