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LSLC Internship Highlights

Life Sciences Learning Center interns and scientists teach in LSLC Outreach Programs; either LSLC On The Road (at local middle/high schools) or LSLC Field Trips (at the LSLC teaching labs)

LSLC Internship Educational Goals

  1. Develop teaching skills though in-class teaching opportunities with diverse student groups
  2. Enhance the intern’s ability to communicate science concepts, concise enough for a middle school student to understand
  3. Hone classroom management skills

Contact us if you are interested in participating in the LSLC Internship

Meet Our Current Interns and Scientists

 

 

 

 

Emily

EmilyLet’s hear from Emily, a Department of Microbiology and Immunology graduate student as she takes a moment to answer questions for LSLC participants.

What is your hometown? Sioux City, IA

If you had to explain what you do to LSLC students, how would you describe your research? I study markers of inflammation and disease in people with HIV. Particularly, I look at small blebs cells release when they are activated.

Why did you decide to intern with the LSLC?  I love sharing cool science techniques and knowledge with people.

What was the first science concept you remember learning in school? It many have not been my first, but one of my favorite science classes was when we were assigned in high school to make a model of the cell out of anything we wanted. I remembered I made a lot of pieces of candy represent the cell’s organelles. Any time when science and food are combined are my favorite lessons!

You are a scientist, but what other things do you like?  I love to go hiking! I made it out to the Adirondacks this fall and loved seeing all the trees changing colors. Also, although I wouldn't say I’m very good at it, I love to bake and try new recipes! 

What encouraging message would you tell LSLC middle school and high school students?  Explore your curiosities!!!

Megan

Megan

Let’s hear from Megan, a Department of Environmental Medicine Post-Doctoral Fellow as she takes a moment to answer questions for LSLC participants.

What is your hometown?

McLeansville, NC

If you had to explain your work to LSLC participants, how would you describe your research?

I do research on the environmental toxicant mercury. Humans are primarily exposed to mercury by eating seafood. Once we ingest the seafood, mercury can get into the bloodstream and travel to the brain, where it causes problems. Mercury is particularly dangerous to the developing brain. I want to understand how mercury causes toxicity to the developing brain.

Why did you decide to teach at the LSLC?  I think the LSLC is an excellent opportunity for young scientists to experience what it is like to conduct experiments and work in the lab. Often times, the constraints in a traditional classroom limit the ability to learn experimentation. I am excited to share this experience with the students, and hopefully engage them to pursue their own research.

What was the first science concept you remember learning in school?  The first science concept I remember learning was the water cycle…evaporation, condensation, precipitation. This is interesting because the water cycle plays a big role in how mercury gets into the environment, which is now a focus of my research.

You are a scientist, but what other things do you like? I like to run! I also really enjoy going to the movies, and go about once a week.

What encouraging message would you tell LSLC middle school and high school students? Have fun with science! And always remember, when do research, you are learning something that no one knew before!