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Medicines and Me

The Medicines and Me lessons have been designed to incorporate over-the-counter (OTC) medicine safety education into life science, biology, health, or family and consumer science classrooms.  Hands-on lesson components are easy to prepare and can be done with inexpensive supplies.  

Resources for each Medicines and Me lesson include:

  • A teacher guide with an answer key and information on how to prepare for the lesson  
  • Student handouts
  • Optional lesson extensions

Lessons

A Family Medicine Cabinet    

Students use information from a brief reading to classify labels and compare over-the-counter drugs with prescription drugs and dietary supplements.  They learn that scientific testing is an important part of determining that drugs are safe and effective.  

A Family Medicine Cabinet Teacher Guide
A Family Medicine Cabinet Student Guide

Choosing and Using Medicines Safely    

Students analyze mini-cases and Drug Facts labels to determine which over-the-counter medicines patients should use and how to use them safely.  

Choosing and Using Medicines Safely Teacher Guide
Choosing and Using Medicines Safely Student Guide

How Much and How Often    

Students test different dosing devices to determine which is most accurate for measuring liquid medicine.  They also use a model to illustrate the effects of taking medicine more frequently than recommended.  

How Much and How Often Teacher Guide
How Much and How Often Student Guide

A Case of Unintentional Overdose    

Students conduct simulated laboratory tests to determine that a young patient’s symptoms are due to liver damage.  They analyze the medicines the patient took to calculate how much acetaminophen he has ingested.  They learn about the role of the liver in maintaining homeostasis.  

A Case of Unintentional Overdose Teacher Guide
A Case of Unintentional Overdose Student Guide

Cold, Flu, or Allergy?     

Students conduct simulated flu tests to determine whether patients have the flu or not.  Product labels are used to select the medicines appropriate for patients with the flu, the common cold, or allergies. 

Cold, Flu, or Allergy? Teacher Guide
Cold, Flu, or Allergy? Student Guide

Developing a New Flu Prevention Drug    

Students explore the processes involved in developing and testing a new flu prevention drug.  They conduct and analyze the results from simulated Phase 1 and Phase 2 clinical trials.  They learn how Phase 3 clinical trials provide additional information needed to ensure that a new drug is safe and effective.

Developing a New Flu Prevention Drug Teacher Guide
Developing a New Flu Prevention Drug Student Guide