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Education & Research

Academic Breastfeeding Medicine Fellowship

Our Breastfeeding Medicine Fellowship is the first formal, academic, breastfeeding medicine fellowship in the country. The program is designed to train doctors in: advanced care of the breastfeeding dyad; community and organizational supports for breastfeeding; breastfeeding research, including public health and biomedical opportunities.

University of Rochester Human Milk and Lactation Research Consortium

The University of Rochester places emphasis on interdepartmental and transformational lactation/breastfeeding research. This pioneering work has paved the way for the organization of the Human Milk and Lactation Research Consortium. Our team consists of leading researchers and providers within the university community who are performing original research in a variety of areas related to lactation/breastfeeding. 

Ann DozierAnn Dozier, Ph.D. - Founder

Professor and Chair
Public Health Sciences, Center for Community Health and Prevention - School of Nursing

Dr. Dozier's research focus is program evaluation methods, including integration of qualitative and quantitative research methods, on maternal and child health outcomes. She has several ongoing projects at the community and statewide level to establish support systems and networks for breastfeeding mothers and infants.

Email Dr. Ann Dozier

Dr. Ann Dozier's Research Profile

Bridget YoungBridget Young, Ph.D. - Co-Founder

Research Assistant Professor
Pediatric Allergy and Immunology, Public Health Sciences

Dr. Young's research focuses on how maternal obesity and insulin resistance impacts bioactive factors in her breast milk. Her lab studies how these factors impact infant pancreatic function, intestinal maturation, and the microbiome.

Email Dr. Bridget Young

Dr. Bridget Young's Research Profile

Mary CasertaMary Caserta, M.D.

Professor
​Pediatrics - Infectious Disease

Dr. Caserta’s research interests focus on viral infections in children and host pathogen interactions with an emphasis on the host immune response.  Additionally, factors that impact the susceptibility of the host to infectious diseases are an area of study.

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Dr. Mary Caserta's Research Profile

Steve CookSteve Cook, M.D., M.P.H.

Associate Professor
Pediatrics, Center for Community Health and Prevention

Dr. Cook has a long standing history of working within the community and primary care setting to improve child health with a family centered approach. He is also a primary investigator on the “Creating Breastfeeding Friendly Communities” grant, which is an ongoing joint venture with the University of Rochester Medical Center and Monroe County Department of Health to improve breastfeeding support infrastructure through a multi-pronged approach.

Email Dr. Steve Cook

Cook Lab Website

Carl D'AngioCarl D'Angio, M.D.

Professor
Pediatrics - Neonatology, Medical Humanities and Bioethics

Dr. D'Angio's research focuses on immunizations and infections in the premature infant. He has led several large research endeavors including: The Rochester/Buffalo NICHD Neonatal Research Network Center, and several other NIH-funded grants related to infections and morbities in the premature infant. 

Email Dr. Carl D'Angio

Dr. Carl D'Angio's Research Profile

Steven GillSteven Gill, Ph.D.

Director, Genomics Research Center; Associate Professor
Microbiology and Immunology

Dr. Gill’s research focuses on the contribution of nutrition on the infant gut microbiota and infant growth. His lab studies development of the infant gut and respiratory microbiota from birth through early life, and the impact of pre- post-natal factors on health outcomes. 

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Dr. Steven Gill's Research Profile

Susan GrothSusan Groth, Ph.D., W.H.N.P.-B.C., F.A.A.N.P.

Associate Professor
School of Nursing, Public Health Sciences

Dr. Groth’s research is centered on obesity and obesity development in women from a biobehavioral perspective. She has a particular interest and expertise in gestational weight gain, post-pregnancy weight retention and long term consequences of that weight on both mothers and their children.

Email Dr. Susan Groth

Dr. Susan Groth's Research Profile

Kirsi Jarvinen-SeppoKirsi Jarvinen-Seppo, M.D., Ph.D.

Chief and Founders' Distinguished Professor in Pediatric Allergy & Immunology; Associate Professor
Pediatric Allergy and Immunology, Department of Microbiology and Immunology

Dr. Jarvinen-Seppo's research program focuses on mechanisms of food allergy and development of neonatal oral tolerance to foods. Her research studies the role of breastfeeding and immunomodulatory factors in breast milk on the development of mucosal immune system and immune responses to foods in the offspring. In addition, she is interested in the role of breast milk components, such as antibodies, in protection against respiratory and diarrheal diseases in the breastfed infant.

Email Dr. Kirsi Jarvinen-Seppo

Dr. Kirsi Jarvinen-Seppo's Research Profile

Todd JuskoTodd Jusko, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor
Public Health Sciences, Environmental Medicine

Dr. Jusko’s research examines how toxicant exposure, particularly during early life, affects the immune system. As such, he is interested in breastfeeding both as a source of chemical exposure, and as a mediator of proper immune system development.

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Dr. Todd Jusko's Research Profile

B. Paige LawrenceB. Paige Lawrence, Ph.D.

Chair, Department of Environmental Medicine; Director, Environmental Health Science Center
Environmental Medicine, Microbiology and Immunology

Dr. Lawrence's research focus includes how the early life environment shapes the development and function of the immune system, including how substances in breast milk influence the health of the offspring. 

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Dr. B. Paige Lawrence's Research Profile

Ruth LawrenceRuth Lawrence, M.D.

Professor
Pediatrics, Northumberland Trust Professorship in Pediatrics

Dr Lawrence has been educating medical professionals about providing care to breastfeeding mothers and infants for decades, and is author of the textbook: "Breastfeeding: A Guide for the Medical Profession" (now in its 8th edition, 2016). Her research interests also involve providing human milk for premature infants, and she has been involved with multiple endeavors and milk banks that meet this need for NICU's across the country.

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Dr. Ruth Lawrence's Research Profile

Camille MartinaCamille Martina, Ph.D.

Research Associate Professor
Environmental Medicine, Public Health Sciences

Dr. Martina is interested in the implications of endocrine disrupting compounds such as Bisphenol A (BPA) and phthalates in breast milk, and resulting impacts on the recipient infant.

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Dr. Camille Martina's Research Profile

Jeff MeyersJeff Meyers, M.D.

Associate Professor
Pediatrics - Neonatology

Dr. Meyers is particularly interested in optimizing infant growth, studying the impact of varying growth patterns on neurodevelopmental outcomes in premature infants, and implementing evidence-based nutritional practices to improve the health of neonates.

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Dr. Jeff Meyers' Research Profile

Gloria PryhuberGloria Pryhuber, M.D.

Professor
Pediatrics - Neonatology, Environmental Medicine

Dr. Gloria Pryhuber co-led the Prematurity and Respiratory Outcomes of Program (PROP) for the University of Rochester and University at Buffalo Divisions of Neonatology from 2010 - 2015. She conducts the UR Respiratory Pathogens Research Center Prematurity, Respiratory Outcomes, Immune System and Microbiome (PRISM) study and she now leads the extension, to subject age 10 years, of the PROP and RPRC-PRISM studies as the University of Rochester Environmental Influences on Child Health Outcomes: Developmental Impact of NICU Exposures (ECHO DINE) cohort.  She is an integral part of a national network of neonatologists, pulmonologists, epidemiologists, immunologists and molecular biologists focused to the lung health of premature infants.

Email Dr. Gloria Pryhuber

Dr. Gloria Pryhuber's Research Profile

Casey Rosen-CaroleCasey Rosen-Carole, M.D., M.P.H., M.Ed.

Assistant Professor
Pediatrics, Obstetrics and Gynecology

Dr. Rosen-Carole’s research focus has been in systems change for breastfeeding education and support of breastfeeding parents. Current research is in design interventions to improve the experience of lactating parents in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit and the impact of these on parental and infant stress, quality and quantity of breast milk.

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Dr. Casey Rosen-Carole's Research Profile

Kristin ScheibleKristin Scheible, M.D.

Assistant Professor
Pediatrics - Neonatology

Dr. Kristin Scheible is a clinical Neonatologist with a research program focusing on mechanisms whereby premature birth disrupts normal immune development.​ She collaborates on several large, NIH-sponsored translational studies examining how normal and abnormal T cell maturation in human infants impacts important health outcomes such as neuro- and respiratory development. Her interest in breastfeeding relates to how components of breastmilk modify infant T cell populations and effector responses. 

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Dr. Kristin Scheible's Research Profile

Loralei ThornburgLoralei Thornburg, M.D.

Associate Professor
Obstetrics and Gynecology - Maternal-Fetal Medicine

Dr. Thornburg's research interest include obesity and impact on ultrasound visualization, accuracy and birth weight prediction. Addition areas of interest include maternal diabetes, especially in the obese patient and teaching optimal care for pregnant women with critical events.

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Dr. Loralei Thornburg's Research Profile