Skip to main content
Explore URMC

menu
Noyes Health / About Noyes / News / Article

Noyes Health Celebrates National Physical Therapy Month

Wednesday, October 21, 2015

Please join all of us at Noyes Health in wishing our Physical Therapy staff in Dansville and Geneseo a Happy National Physical Therapy month! The theme for 2015 is Age Well. Staff includes Michael Donegan, PT, DPT, Marsha Wallace, PT, Paula Rocha, PT, Shelly Trim, PTA, Dawn Johnston, PTA, Jessica Kershner, MSPT, Giles Churchman, PTA, Tessa Hendershott, PTA, Zachary Mix DPT, and Paul Kreher, PT, DPT. And, the friendly support staff includes: Hayley Motzer-Boufford in Dansville and Linda Naples in Geneseo.

Physical Therapists treat a wide array of musculo-skeletal injuries with exercise, manual therapy, modalities, and patient education. Our clinic in Geneseo offers Aquatic therapy in the state-of-the-art Hydrotrack. In many cases, we help individuals avoid surgery, avoid or lessen long term medication use, return to work or sport, recover from surgery, and generally live a healthier life with less pain!

Physical Therapy started as a profession back in the early part of the last century. The polio epidemic brought about the need for formalized muscle strength testing and re-education in 1916. In 1917, as the U.S. entered WWI, the army recognized the need to rehabilitate wounded soldiers. The Division of Special Hospitals and Physical Reconstruction developed 15 "reconstruction aide" training programs, and this later developed into the profession of Physical Therapy. Today, there are over 204,000 licensed Physical Therapists in the U.S. We are proud to say we have the area’s most highly trained and educated staff here at Noyes Health! Our therapists pride themselves in their focus of giving each patient individualized, professional attention. Thank you to our Physical Therapy Team for your dedication to the profession and the community you serve!

9 Physical Therapist Tips to Help You #AgeWell

We can't stop time. Or can we? The right type and amount of physical activity can help stave off many age-related health problems. Physical therapists, who are movement experts, prescribe physical activity that can help you overcome pain, gain and maintain movement, and preserve your independence—often helping you avoid the need for surgery or long-term use of prescription drugs.

Here are nine things physical therapists want you to know to #AgeWell.

1. Chronic pain doesn't have to be the boss of you. Each year 116 million Americans experience chronic pain from arthritis or other conditions, costing billions of dollars in medical treatment, lost work time, and lost wages. Proper exercise, mobility, and pain management techniques can ease pain while moving and at rest, improving your overall quality of life.

2. You can get stronger when you're older. Research shows that improvements in strength and physical function are possible in your 60s, 70s, and even 80s and older with an appropriate exercise program. Progressive resistance training, in which muscles are exercised against resistance that gets more difficult as strength improves, has been shown to prevent frailty.

3. You may not need surgery or drugs for low back pain. Low back pain is often over-treated with surgery and drugs despite a wealth of scientific evidence demonstrating that physical therapy can be an effective alternative—and with much less risk than surgery and long-term use of prescription medications.

4. You can lower your risk of diabetes with exercise. One in four Americans over the age of 60 has diabetes. Obesity and physical inactivity can put you at risk for this disease. But a regular, appropriate physical activity routine is one of the best ways to prevent—and manage—type 1 and type 2 diabetes.

5. Exercise can help you avoid falls—and keep your independence About one in three U.S. adults age 65 or older falls each year. More than half of adults over 65 report problems with movement, including walking 1/4 mile, stooping and standing. Group-based exercises led by a physical therapist can improve movement and balance and reduce your risk of falls. It can also reduce your risk of hip fractures (95 percent of which are caused by falls).

6. Your bones want you to exercise. Osteoporosis or weak bones affects more than half of Americans over the age of 54. Exercises that keep you on your feet, like walking, jogging, or dancing, and exercises using resistance, such as weightlifting, can improve bone strength or reduce bone loss.

7. Your heart wants you to exercise. Heart disease is the No. 1 cause of death in the US. One of the top ways of preventing it and other cardiovascular diseases? Exercise! Research shows that if you already have heart disease, appropriate exercise can improve your health.

8. Your brain wants you to exercise. People who are physically active—even later in life—are less likely to develop memory problems or Alzheimer's disease, a condition which affects more than 40% of people over the age of 85.

9. You don't "just have to live with" bladder leakage. More than 13 million women and men in the US have bladder leakage. Don't spend years relying on pads or rushing to the bathroom. Seek help from a physical therapist.

For more information on Noyes Health visit www.noyes-health.org, Noyes Health Facebook Page, or contact Cynthia Oswald, PR/Marketing Director, at coswald@noyes-hospital.org or 585-335-4323.

Media Contact

Public Relations Department

(585) 275-3676

article hit counter