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Michael Andrew Cummings, M.D.,M.S.

Contact Information

Phone Numbers

Appointment: (585) 275-2171

Administrative: (585) 275-2171

Fax: (585) 335-8697

URMFGA member of the University of Rochester Medical Faculty Group

groupAn Accountable Health Partner

assignmentAccepting New Patients

Faculty Appointments

Patient Care Setting

Radiation Oncology

Biography

Michael Cummings received his master's degree in Natural Sciences from SUNY University at Buffalo in 2009 and his medical degree from SUNY Upstate Medical University in 2013.

Dr. Cummings is an Assistant Professor of Radiation Oncology at the University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry.

Dr. Cummings specializes in head and neck cancers, prostate cancer, bladder cancer and CNS metastatic disease. He believes the best approach is finding how the uniqueness of each person and their case fits into the published evidence and their own expectations.

Dr. Cummings is married with two sons and enjoys running in his free time.

He is a member of the American Society of Therapeutic Radiation Oncology.

Credentials

Education

2009
MD | Suny Upstate Medical University

Post-doctoral Training & Residency

07/01/2014 - 06/28/2018
Residency in Radiation Oncology at University of Rochester Medical Center

07/01/2013 - 06/30/2014
Internship in Internal Medicine at Suny Upstate Medical University

Awards


Alpha Omega Alpha, Medical Honor Society

Clinical Trials

Phase III Randomized Trial of Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy with or Without Atezolizumab in Localized Muscle Invasive Bladder Cancer (S1806)

Lead Researcher: Michael Andrew Cummings

This phase III trial studies how well chemotherapy and radiation therapy work with or without atezolizumab in treating patients with localized muscle invasive bladder cancer. Radiation therapy uses high energy rays to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Chemotherapy drugs, such as gemcitabine, cisplatin, fluorouracil and mitomycin-C, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving chemotherapy with radiation therapy may kill more tumor cells. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as atezolizumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving atezolizumab with radiation therapy and chemotherapy may work better in treating patients with localized muscle invasive bladder cancer compared to radiation therapy and chemotherapy without atezolizumab.

View Study Details

Publications

Journal Articles

11/9/2020
Luitje ME, Israel AK, Cummings MA, Giampoli EJ, Allen PD, Newlands SD, Ovitt CE. "Long-term maintenance of acinar cells in human submandibular glands after radiation therapy." International journal of radiation oncology, biology, physics.. 2020 Nov 9; Epub 2020 Nov 09.

2/25/2020
Milano MT, Bates JE, Budnik J, Qiu H, Hardy S, Cummings MA, Baumgart MA, Maggiore RJ, Mulford DA, Usuki KY. "Risk of brain metastases in T1-3N0 NSCLC: a population-based analysis." . 2020 Feb 25; 9(1):LMT25. Epub 2020 Feb 25.

4/2019
Cummings MA, Usuki KY, Fleming FJ, Tejani MA, Katz AW. "Short course radiation therapy for rectal cancer in the elderly: can radical surgery be avoided?" Journal of gastrointestinal oncology.. 2019 Apr 0; 10(2):357-361.

VIEW ALL PUBLICATIONS