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Total Solar Eclipse 2024

Experience the Wonder, Protect Your Health

Are you ready to witness a rare phenomenon? Rochester, New York is in the path of totality for the Total Solar Eclipse on Monday, April 8, 2024. Here’s what you need to know to experience this extraordinary event safely.

Free Solar Eclipse Viewing Glasses

Available in our Flaum Optical Shops. No purchase necessary. Limited quantities available.

View of the sun in a solar eclipse

UR Medicine’s Safety Guidelines

Always use certified eclipse glasses or solar viewers that meet the ISO 12312-2 safety standard. Check for the manufacturer's name and address, as well as the ISO certification label on the glasses. Avoid using glasses that are scratched, damaged, or older than three years.

Never look directly at the sun with the naked eye, binoculars, telescopes, or cameras without proper solar filters or eclipse glasses. Doing so can cause serious eye damage, including permanent vision loss.

If you don't have eclipse glasses, you can use alternative indirect viewing methods to observe the eclipse safely. These include pinhole projectors, solar eclipse viewers, or even a simple cardboard box with a pinhole camera.

Even during partial phases of the eclipse when the sun is partially covered by the moon, it's important to wear eclipse glasses or use indirect viewing methods to protect your eyes. Only remove your glasses or stop using viewing devices during the brief moments of totality during a total solar eclipse.

Ensure that children do not look directly at the sun during the eclipse. Supervise them closely and provide them with certified eclipse glasses or encourage them to use indirect viewing methods to observe the eclipse safely. Also try to keep pets from looking directly at the sun.

Don’t forget to protect your skin from harmful UV radiation during the eclipse. Apply sunscreen with a high SPF to all exposed skin, wear protective clothing, and seek shade whenever possible.

Video: Always use certified eclipse glasses or solar viewers that meet the ISO 12312-2 safety standard!

Get Care During the Solar Eclipse

If you find yourself in need of medical care during the eclipse, UR Medicine is here to provide the healthcare you need.

Virtual Care

On-demand video visits for minor illnesses and injuries

Hours
Monday to Friday, 7 a.m.–8 p.m.
Weekends, 8 a.m.–12 p.m. & 12:30–4:30 p.m.

Average Wait Time: 5-15 minutes

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Urgent Care

Non-emergency injuries and illnesses

Hours
Hours vary by location

View Urgent Care Locations

 

Emergency Care

For life-threatening injuries

Hours
24/7 care at 9 locations

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Not sure where to go based on your symptoms?

Symptom Guide

Frequently Asked Questions

No, it is not safe to look directly at a solar eclipse without proper eye protection. Doing so can cause serious eye damage, including permanent vision loss. Always use certified eclipse glasses or solar viewers to protect your eyes during a solar eclipse.

Make sure your eclipse glasses are certified to meet the ISO 12312-2 safety standard. Check for the manufacturer's name and address, as well as the ISO certification label on the glasses.

No, regular sunglasses are not safe for viewing a solar eclipse. They do not provide adequate protection against the intense sunlight and harmful solar radiation during an eclipse. Always use certified eclipse glasses or solar viewers specifically designed for viewing the sun.

Eclipse glasses can be found at many local stores throughout the Greater Rochester area. If you don't have eclipse glasses, you can use alternative indirect viewing methods to observe the eclipse safely. These include pinhole projectors, solar eclipse viewers, or even a simple cardboard box with a pinhole camera. Never look directly at the sun without proper eye protection.

Yes, you can take photos of the eclipse with your smartphone, but make sure to use a solar filter to protect your phone's camera and your eyes. Do not attempt to take photos of the eclipse without proper protection, as this can damage your phone's camera and potentially harm your eyes.

It's important to protect your skin from harmful UV radiation during the eclipse. Apply sunscreen with a high SPF to all exposed skin, wear protective clothing, and seek shade whenever possible. Stay hydrated and avoid prolonged exposure to direct sunlight, especially during peak eclipse times.

If you experience any health issues during the eclipse, such as eye discomfort, sunburn, or dehydration, seek medical attention as needed. Follow standard safety guidelines for protecting your eyes and skin, and don't hesitate to contact a healthcare provider if you have any concerns about your health.