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New Issue of Opportunities to Explore

Monday, December 17, 2018

Highlighted Event

(*) Faculty and Student Experiences with Online Learning at the University of Rochester

Thursday, December 13 | 12:00 pm-1:00pm | Genrich Rusling, LeChase Hall, River Campus
Part of the Fall 2018 University Online Learning Symposium Series. Lunch will be provided and advanced registration is required. Register for this event at this Survey Registration Page. Questions or accommodation request to adele.coelho@rochester.edu

Read The Full Issue

Study: Neurons in the Brain Work as a Team to Guide Movement of Arms, Hands

Tuesday, December 11, 2018

Hands waving in the skyThe apparent simplicity of picking up a cup of coffee or turning a doorknob belies the complex sequence of calculations and processes that the brain must undergo to identify the location of an item in space, move the arm and hand toward it, and shape the fingers to hold or manipulate the object. New research, published today in the journal Cell Reports, reveals how the nerve cells responsible for motor control modify their activity as we reach and grasp for objects. These findings upend the established understanding of how the brain undertakes this complex task and could have implications for the development of neuro-prosthetics.

“This study shows that activity patterns in populations of neurons shift progressively during the course of a single movement,” said Marc Schieber, M.D., Ph.D., a professor in the University of Rochester Medical Center (URMC) Department of Neurology and the Del Monte Institute for Neuroscience and a co-author of the study. “Interpreting these shifts in activity that allow groups of neurons to work together to perform distinctive and precise movements is the first step in understanding how to harness this information for potential new therapies.”

Read More: Study: Neurons in the Brain Work as a Team to Guide Movement of Arms, Hands

New Issue of Opportunities to Explore - December 10-14, 2018

Friday, December 7, 2018

A new issue of Opportunities to Explore is out with events, funding opportunities and resources 

This weeks Highlight:

Resource of the week

Have you joined the University of Rochester’s online community to connect with alumni, students, faculty, and staff? The Meliora Collective goes beyond what social media networks offer - an exclusive University of Rochester community of alumni, students, parents and friends who want to make meaningful connections for personal and professional exploration and growth. Check out a short video on the Collective at vimeo.com/289733971 . Sign up and join the Collective at thecollective.rochester.edu/

Read The Full Issue

Rochester graduate student named Schwarzman Scholar

Friday, December 7, 2018

University of Rochester graduate student Beixi Li is one of 140 students selected worldwide as a Schwarzman Scholar.

University of Rochester graduate student Beixi Li is one of 140 students selected worldwide as a Schwarzman Scholar. (University of Rochester photo / J. Adam Fenster)

University of Rochester graduate student Beixi Li has been named a 2019-20 Schwarzman Scholar, one of about 140 selected worldwide for this prestigious graduate fellowship. She’ll develop leadership skills and professional networks in a one-year master’s program at China’s elite Tsinghua University in Beijing, beginning next August.

“I’m really excited,” the Shanghai, China, native says. “After going through the application process and long interview sessions, it was great to know that everything I did was worth the effort. I’m thrilled to be part of this program.”

The international fellowship was established in 2016 with a $100 million donation by philanthropist Stephen Schwarzman, whose goal was to prepare the next generation of global leaders by providing an unparalleled opportunity to gain some understanding of China through an immersive experience. Students pursue a master’s degree in global affairs, with concentrations in public policy, economics and business, or international studies. They spend a year in an international community of thinkers, innovators, and leaders in business, politics, and society.

Nearly 2,900 candidates from around the world applied.

Li is currently pursuing a master of public health degree at Rochester’s School of Medicine and Dentistry and expects to graduate in May. Her thesis examines the potential impact of maternal dental amalgams (fillings) on offspring neurodevelopment.

As a Schwarzman Scholar, Li intends to concentrate in public policy. She plans a career in preventive medicine, with a focus on children, in the fields of environmental hazards, tobacco control, or infectious diseases.

“The world today is facing various public health issues, like environmental pollution, the Ebola viruses in Africa, the opioid epidemic in the United States, and smoking abuse among teens and adults,” Li says. “I’ve always believed that preventive medicine and public health are the most effective ways to save the lives of millions in the world.”

Li is the first Rochester recipient since Jintian (Jay) Li ’12 (no relation) was selected to the inaugural class. Suman Kumar ’19, a mechanical engineering major from Lalitpur, Nepal, was a Schwarzman Scholar semifinalist and one of around 400 who reached the interview stage of the competition.

“We are delighted and proud to have another Rochester student join the ranks of Schwarzman Scholars and hope that Beixi’s selection will inspire more students, including those in graduate and professional degree programs, to consider applying in the future,” says Belinda Redden, director of the Fellowships Office.

Li earned her undergraduate degree in preventive medicine from Xiangya School of Medicine at Central South University in Changsha, China, and is a licensed medical doctor in her native country. She began her Rochester graduate study program in fall 2017.

 

US News and World Report Article: What You Can Do With a Biology Degree?

Tuesday, December 4, 2018

Recently the US News and World report website published an article discussing what you can do with a biology degree. The article features input from URBEST Executive Director, Tracey Baas.

The article goes into detail on the types of jobs a graduate can expect, the variety of roles pursuing such a degree opens up for you including industry options while detailing further academic choices. To read the entire article, visit the US News and World Report Website

Read More: US News and World Report Article: What You Can Do With a Biology Degree?

New Issue of Opportunities to Explore - December 3-7, 2018

Monday, December 3, 2018

A new issue of Opportunities to Explore is out with events, funding opportunities and resources 

This weeks Highlight:

Bio Careers Webinar Series: “The Job Search Process: What Companies Look for When Evaluating Talent”

CPD Sponsored Workshop

Wednesday, December 5 | 1:00 pm-2:00 pm | 2-7539, URMC
In this seminar, Propel Careers will provide insight on the job search process and what companies look for when evaluating talent. Propel will discuss the importance of tailoring a resume and cover letter for a specific position. Propel Careers will also discuss how companies utilize resume databases and LinkedIn to identify talent. Propel will provide tips on how candidates can standout from the crowd. For more information about this event, please contact CPD-SMD-Grad@URMC.Rochester.edu. Trainees can also register and via the webinar by visiting the Gotowebinar site.

Read The Full Issue

Professor Harold Smith, Ph.D. appears on Evan Dawson Radio Program

Thursday, November 29, 2018

Harold C. Smith was a guest along with Bob Duffy (CEO of the Greater Rochester Chamber of Commerce), Jason Klimek (attorney with Boylan Code), Zachary Sarkis (co-founder of Flower City Solutions) and Jacob Fox (founder of Closed Loop Systems) on WXXI Connections with Evan Dawson on 11/21/2018 to address the opportunities and questions surround the emerging hemp industry in Up State NY.  (listen to Hemp101http://www.wxxinews.org/programs/connections?page=1&ajax=1)

Dr. Smith spoke regarding the future of labeling and dosing of THC-free and THC-containing products relative to what we understanding from scientific and clinical research. Having founded CannaMetrix, LLC, a New York based company, Dr. Smith seeks to establish through patent pending, cell-based assays, to raise the standards for product development and quality control so as to better information patient choices of products containing full spectrum plant cannabinoids or synthetic cannabinoids and advance medicinal use of cannabis.

Jean Bidlack Featured on WXXI's Second Opinion

Wednesday, November 28, 2018

Professor of Pharmacology and Physiology, Jean Bidlack, Ph.D. and her research were recently featured on WXXI's Second Opinion.

The Medical Innovations segment will air with the "Alcoholism" episode on WXXI where Dr. Bidlack discusses how when dopamine levels spike in the brain, it leads to the very strong reinforcing properties of addiction.

The program will air Thursday January, 3rd at 8:30pm but can be viewed below as well.

New Issue of Opportunities to Explore

Monday, November 26, 2018

The latest issue of opportunities to explore is out, packed with events, information and resources starting from next week and well into next month

Opportunities to Explore - November 26-30, 2018

23rd WCI Scientific Symposium

Thursday, November 15, 2018

Keynote Lecture

Keynote Lecture in Progress

Supriya Mohile

Supriya Mohile, M.D., M.S.

Judith Campisi

Judith Campisi, Ph.D. 

“This week GDSC assisted the Wilmot Cancer Institute (WCI) in hosting their Twenty Third Scientific Symposium for Cancer Research and Treatment.  Graduate Students working in basic, translational and clinical cancer research displayed posters of their respective cancer studies in the Flaum Atrium. GDSC and other faculty gave lectures; including Brian Altman, Stephano Mello, Dirk Bohmann, Vera Gorbunova, Joe Chakkalakal, Laurie Steiner, and Ben Frisch. Additionally, WCI professor Supriya Mohile, gave the Davey Award Lecture titled Improving Care Delivery for Older Patients with Cancer. Finally, Judith Campisi, Ph.D. of the Buck Institute for Research on Aging and USC Leonard Davis School of Gerontology presented the symposium's keynote lecture titled “Cancer and aging: Rival Demons?”

Congratulations to Phong Nguyen and Jose Suarez Loor for receiving ORS Travel Awards!

Thursday, November 15, 2018

Congratulations to PhD students Phong Nguyen and Jose Suarez Loor for receiving Orthopaedic Research Society (ORS) Travel Awards to attend the 2018 ORS Tendon Section Conference in Portland, OR! For more information, please see here: https://www.ors.org/tendon-2018-conference/

URMC Student/Trainee Travel Awards 2018 Request for Applications

Tuesday, November 13, 2018

Two travel reimbursement awards of up to $1,000 will be given this funding cycle (one for clinical research and one for basic sciences research) to support a University of Rochester School of Medicine & Dentistry medical student, graduate student, postdoctoral trainee, clinical resident, and/or clinical fellow to attend important national or international meetings at which they will present their research and make professional connections.
 
Eligible applications for the current cycle are for travel between September 1, 2018 and February 28, 2019. Submission Deadline: Friday, December 14, 2018, 6:00 pm. For questions, email Amy Blatt, M.D. or call 585-275-4912.

View the full RFA.
 
 

Congratulations Eugene!

Monday, November 12, 2018

Eugene Kim With Advisor Jianwen Que

Eugene Kim

We celebrated the successful PhD defense by Eugene Kim last Friday. Working with Jianwen Que, Eugene has identified a significant progenitor cell population in the early foregut. She used a combination of xenopus and mouse models to demonstrate that the transcription factor Isl1 enriched in the unique progenitor population regulates the separation of the esophagus from the trachea. These findings provide important insights into the pathobiology of a relatively common birth defect esophageal atresia with/without trachea-esophageal fistula (EA/TEF). Eugene has a passion for studying developmental biology and stem cells in regeneration, and she plans for a future career in these areas!

Congratulations to the 4th Annual Immune Imaging Symposium Poster and Image Winners

Monday, November 12, 2018

Wish the four winners a hardy congratulations when you see them.

Image Winner McRaePoster Winner Amitrano

Poster Winner PrizantPoster Winner Schrock

New Issue of Opportunities to Explore

Monday, November 12, 2018

The latest issue of opportunities to explore is out, packed with events, information and resources starting from next week and well into next month

Opportunities to Explore - November 12-16, 2018

Congratulations Fanju!

Thursday, November 8, 2018

Fanju Meng

On Thursday, Fanju Meng successfully defended his PhD thesis. Under mentorship of Dr. Benoit Biteau, Fanju’s studies focus on the regulatory network that coordinates stem cell proliferation and differentiation in the Drosophila intestinal epithelium. Using advanced fly genetics and cell biology methods, Fanju characterized the expression and role of several transcription factors in adult intestinal progenitors. His work significantly improves our understanding of the programs controlling stem cell function and establishes the fruit fly as a model to study these conserved, critical stem cell factors. His findings have been published in Cell Reports and Stem Cell Investigation. And there are additional papers in the pipeline! Fanju was a recipient of a NYSTEM training grant hosted by the Department of Biomedical Genetics, and the Goodman Doctoral Dissertation Fellowship from the University of Rochester. Fanju is now planning on continuing in his work in the field of stem cell and cancer biology using genetic model organisms – and we wish him the best of luck! You will be missed.

For further reading, please see:

Fanju Meng Successfully Defending His Ph.D. Thesis
Fanju Meng Successfully Defending His Ph.D. Thesis

GDSC Halloween Costume Contest!

Thursday, November 8, 2018

Last week GDSC held our Halloween Costume Contest. Our three GDSC student contestants can be seen below.

Derek Crowe as Bart Simpson

Derek Crowe as Bart Simpson

Anne Roskowski as Sailor Moon.

Anne Roskowski as Sailor Moon

Neal Shah as a Medical Garbed Squidward.

Neal Shah as a Medical Garbed Squidward

Derek Crowe earned a very close second place with 14 votes. While first place went to Anne Roskowski with 15 votes. Congrats Anne!”

Dumont Receives 2018 Outstanding Graduate Student Teacher Award

Tuesday, November 6, 2018

kielkopf lab door

 

Biochemistry professor Mark Dumont, Ph.D. is the recipient of the 2018 Outstanding Graduate Student Teacher Award. Established in 2013, this award is given to an outstanding graduate student teacher for record of excellence in classroom instruction. Mark was nominated by graduate students Brandon Davis, Ashwin Kumar and Matthew Raymonda.

This award was presented at the School of Medicine and Dentistry Convocation Ceremony, September 6, 2018.

The department would like to extend congratulations to Mark on this well- deserved honor.

New Issue of Opportunities to Explore

Friday, November 2, 2018

The latest issue of opportunities to explore is out, packed with events, information and resources starting from next week and well into next month

Opportunities to Explore - November 5-9, 2018

GDSC Fall Retreat

Thursday, November 1, 2018

Our graduate program in Genetics, Development and Stem Cells (GDSC) celebrated another successful season of research and academic growth. On the afternoon of Friday October 26th 2018, the faculty, students and families of GDSC held our Fall Retreat at the Ellison Park Pavilion Lodge. Among our many reasons to celebrate was our Department’s recent faculty expansion including, Brian J. Altman, Stephano Spano Mello, and Patrick J. Murphy. Welcome! We also celebrated the faculty promotion of Benoit Biteau to Associate Professor. Finally, we celebrated the future research of faculty members Margot Mayer-Pröschel, Douglas Portman, Chris Pröschel, and Andy Samuelson each of whom obtained prominent research grants earlier this year. Our festivities included pumpkin carvings, board games and a cocktail hour. There were also three hotly contested rounds of Science Trivia. (The final scores for the first and second place teams were separated by a margin of half a point!) The winning team “Smooth ER” included members Derek Crow, Li Xie, Shen Zhou, Yungeng Pang, Mark Noble, Daxiang Na, and Andy Samuelson. Additionally, Jessie Hogestyn won our “Hidden Facts” contest testing one’s knowledge of eccentric or esoteric trivia regarding GDSC faculty and students. Photos of GDSC’s genetic festivities can be seen below.

GDSC Fall Retreat 2018

New Issue of Opportunities to Explore

Friday, October 26, 2018

The latest issue of opportunities to explore is out, packed with events, information and resources starting from next week and well into next month

Opportunities to Explore - October 29-November 2, 2018

CMPP Graduate Student Published in Nature Communications

Wednesday, October 24, 2018

Edward Ayoub With PosterEdward Ayoub, a Graduate student in the Cellular and Molecular Pharmacology and Physiology PhD Program and member of Archibald Perkins Lab published in Nature Communications on 10/12/2018. More information can be found on the Nature Website.

Paper Title & Abstract

EVI1 overexpression reprograms hematopoiesis via upregulation of Spi1 transcription

Edward Ayoub, Michael P. Wilson, Kathleen E. McGrath, Allison J. Li, Benjamin J. Frisch, James Palis, Laura M. Calvi, Yi Zhang & Archibald S. Perkins

Inv(3q26) and t(3:3)(q21;q26) are specific to poor-prognosis myeloid malignancies, and result in marked overexpression of EVI1, a zinc-finger transcription factor and myeloid-specific oncoprotein. Despite extensive study, the mechanism by which EVI1 contributes to myeloid malignancy remains unclear. Here we describe a new mouse model that mimics the transcriptional effects of 3q26 rearrangement. We show that EVI1 overexpression causes global distortion of hematopoiesis, with suppression of erythropoiesis and lymphopoiesis, and marked premalignant expansion of myelopoiesis that eventually results in leukemic transformation. We show that myeloid skewing is dependent on DNA binding by EVI1, which upregulates Spi1, encoding master myeloid regulator PU.1. We show that EVI1 binds to the −14 kb upstream regulatory element (−14kbURE) at Spi1; knockdown of Spi1dampens the myeloid skewing. Furthermore, deletion of the −14kbURE at Spi1 abrogates the effects of EVI1 on hematopoietic stem cells. These findings support a novel mechanism of leukemogenesis through EVI1 overexpression.

New Issue of Opportunities to Explore

Monday, October 22, 2018

The latest issue of opportunities to explore is out, packed with events, information and resources starting from next week and well into next month

Opportunities to Explore - October 22-26, 2018

Former Tox Student Claire McCarthy, PhD Featured on NPR

Thursday, October 18, 2018

McCarthy

Early one morning in the spring of 2017, former Toxicology graduate student Claire McCarthy (Sime Lab) started her day as many don't: rolling dried rhinoceros dung into cigarettes and packing them into a machine that smoked them.

Although it might seem bizarre, McCarthy's purpose was serious: She wanted to know what happens when people breathe in dung smoke.

Dung smoke is no joke. Animal dung is used by millions globally for heating and cooking.

It's a dangerous practice. Burning biomass fuels (including animal dung as well as wood, charcoal, and plant matter) generates indoor air pollution, which caused 4 million deaths worldwide in 2012 according to the World Health Organization. Like cigarette smoke, biomass smoke has been linked to increased risk of lung diseases, such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder (COPD), lung cancer and respiratory infection.

Read More: Former Tox Student Claire McCarthy, PhD Featured on NPR

New Issue of Opportunities to Explore

Thursday, October 11, 2018

The latest issue of opportunities to explore is out, packed with events, information and resources starting from next week and well into next month

Opportunities to Explore - October 15-19, 2018

New Issue of Opportunities to Explore

Friday, September 28, 2018

The latest issue of opportunities to explore is out, packed with events, information and resources starting from next week and well into next month

Opportunities to Explore - October 1-5, 2018

CMPP Graduate Student Brandon Berry Wins Poster Award

Monday, September 24, 2018

The Wojtovich lab attended the Translational Research in Mitochondria, Aging, and Disease (TRiMaD) Symposium.  A yearly event that brings together approximately 150-200 scientists from the Northeast to discuss the role of mitochondria in aging and disease. 

8th Annual TRiMaD Website

Brandon Berry, Graduate Student in Wojtovich lab, was one of four recipients to win a poster award for his work entitled “Novel Optogenetic control of mitochondrial energetics rescues electron transport chain inhibition”

Adrian Moises Molina Vargas is awarded Graduate Alumni Convocation Award

Friday, September 14, 2018

Adrian (’18 University of Alcalá, Spain), one of three new 2018 recruits to the GDSC program was awarded the Graduate Alumni Convocation Award to recognize his promise for exceptional accomplishment in graduate studies. During his year of studying abroad at Tufts during 2017-2018, Adrian worked in the Mirkin lab to study the role of cdc13 mutations in genome instability.

In addition, Sarah Spahr (’18 Ohio State University) was nominated for the Irving Spar Fellowship and Tom O’Connor (’17 University of Buffalo) was nominated for the Newell Stannard Graduate Student Scholarship Award. Congratulations to all three!

Adrian Moises Molina Vargas Sarah Spahr Tom O'Connor

Adrian, Sarah & Tom

GDSC Team Participates in 6th annual Wilmot “Warrior Walk”

Friday, September 14, 2018

GDSC Team supports the 2017 Wilmot Cancer Warrior Walk
GDSC Team supports the 2017 Wilmot Cancer Warrior Walk

Students and faculty from Biomedical Genetics and the GDSC program attended the 6th Wilmot Cancer Institute Warrior Walk on Sunday. Aptly named the “NextGen Cancer Busters” to symbolize the graduate students and post-docs training to become cancer researchers, the GDSC team mingled with cancer survivors and family members, to support the fight against cancer. As one team member pointed out: “Meeting cancer survivors really helps put the work in the lab into perspective”.

In addition to the Cancer Survivor Walk, “NextGen Cancer Busters” also participated in the 10k and 5k events. Notably, Dalia Ghoneim (5k) and Adam Cornwall (10k) and placed 1st and 2nd in their group, and 2nd and 7th overall.  In addition, Scott Friedland and our new faculty addition, Brian Altman, both placed 4th in their age group for the 5k. Congratulations!!

Neuroscience Graduate Program Student Receives Award for SfN Trainee Professional Development

Tuesday, September 11, 2018

Photo of Emily WarnerEmily Warner was recently selected to receive a 2018 Trainee Professional Development Award (TPDA) from the Society for Neuroscience.  These are highly competitive awards and it is a great achievement for Emily.

The award comes with a complementary registration to the conference in San Diego and a monetary award of $1000.  Emily will present a poster at a poster session for other recipients and will be able to attend several Professional Development Workshops while at the conference.

Congratulations Emily!

New Issue of Opportunities to Explore

Monday, September 10, 2018

The latest issue of opportunities to explore is out(September 10-14), packed with events, information and resources starting from next week and well into next month

Opportunities to Explore - September 10-14, 2018

New Issue of Opportunities to Explore

Monday, September 3, 2018

The latest issue of opportunities to explore is out, packed with events, information and resources starting from next week and well into next month

Opportunities to Explore - September 3-7, 2018

New Issue of Opportunities to Explore

Sunday, August 26, 2018

The latest issue of opportunities to explore is out, packed with events, information and resources starting from next week and well into next month

Opportunities to Explore - August 27-31, 2018

Neuroscience Graduate Program Student Receive 3 Convocation Awards

Wednesday, August 22, 2018

Congratulations to our NGP students for again earning these honors at this year's School of Medicine and Dentistry Convocation Ceremony.

  • Kathryn Toffolo (1st year):  Merritt and Marjorie Cleveland Fellowship Award
    • This fellowship was established in 1991 from Mr. and Mrs. Merritt Cleveland and is awarded to a Ph.D. student entering graduate study through the Biomedical Sciences Program with interest in developing a neuroscience-related research career.
  • Monique Mendes (4th year): Outstanding Student Mentor Award
    • This award, established in 2015, recognizes a student mentor who guides, supports and promotes the training and career development of others.
  • Gregory Reilly (1st year): J. Newell Stannard Graduate Student Scholarship Award
    • This scholarship was established by Dr. Stannard, Professor Emeritus, to recognize one deserving incoming graduate student for their commendable academic achievements. Dr. Stannard developed the world’s first doctoral program in radiation biology at the School of Medicine and was a faculty member for almost 40 years before retiring in 1975. He taught and mentored hundreds of students who went on to become leaders and experts in the field of radiation health.

School of Medicine Names New Dean for Graduate Education

Tuesday, August 21, 2018

Photo of Richard Libby

Richard T. Libby, Ph.D.

Richard T. Libby Ph.D., professor of Ophthalmology and of Biomedical Genetics at the University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, and a member of the University’s Center for Visual Science, has been named Senior Associate Dean for Graduate Education and Postdoctoral Affairs (GEPA), pending approval of the University Board of Trustees. Beginning Sept. 1, Libby will direct the School of Medicine and Dentistry’s Ph.D., postdoctoral and master’s degree programs. He succeeds Edith M. Lord, Ph.D., who served a decade in the role and is shifting her focus to microbiology and immunology research.

An innovative researcher in the neurobiology of glaucoma, Libby arrived in Rochester in 2006 after postdoctoral and fellowship experiences that enlightened him on the power of model genetics systems in the study of eye disease. Years spent training at the Medical Research Council’s Institute for Hearing Research in Nottingham, England, and the Jackson Laboratory in Bar Harbor, Maine, formed the foundation for his current laboratory, which is focused on understanding the cell signaling pathways that lead to vision loss in glaucoma.

Libby is director of the Cell Biology of Disease Graduate Program, has served on numerous academic committees integral to research activities and graduate education, and is a respected mentor and teacher. He has published, as author or co-author, more than 60 peer-reviewed scientific articles and numerous reviews, book chapters and commentaries, and has presented internationally on a range of topics in eye and vision research.

“Rick understands that excellence in a research enterprise is essential to attracting the best and brightest talent and has articulated a vision for further improving the experience here, making it clear to the outside world that Rochester is the best place to learn and study,” said Mark Taubman, M.D., CEO of the Medical Center and Dean of the School of Medicine and Dentistry at the University of Rochester. “He is a passionate scientist whose experience in a clinical department will bring valuable insight to graduate programs in basic and clinical research—a true asset to his role in helping prepare future generations of scientists.”

“Complementing his expertise in leading graduate programs, and thorough understanding of their needs, Rick has developed a thoughtful approach to what it will take to continue moving them forward. It’s clear that he’s driven by a desire to develop our trainees and motivated to give them the best graduate/postdoctoral experience possible,” said Stephen Dewhurst, Ph.D., Vice Dean for Research at the School of Medicine and Dentistry and Associate Vice President for Health Sciences Research at the University of Rochester. “In addition, having developed his own career in a somewhat untraditional way, Rick brings an added dimension to understanding and supporting others who are exploring diverse career options.”

Libby received a doctorate degree in biology from Boston College in the field of neurodevelopment.  He was a postdoctoral fellow at the Medical Research Council’s Institute for Hearing Research in Nottingham England, and a postdoctoral fellow at the Jackson Laboratory in Bar Harbor, Maine. He joined the School of Medicine and Dentistry faculty as an assistant professor in 2006, was named associate professor in 2012, and professor in 2018.

“Rick is a great choice to succeed Edith Lord as the Senior Associate Dean for Graduate Education,” said Dirk Bohmann, Ph.D., Donald M. Foster, M.D. Professor of Biomedical Genetics and Senior Associate Dean for Basic Research, who led the search committee. “He realizes that research excellence and successful graduate and postdoctoral programs are mutually dependent. You cannot have one without the other. He will be a passionate advocate for the graduate students and postdocs.”

“Under Dr. Lord’s leadership, GEPA has greatly enhanced the support and training of URMC’s graduate students and postdoctoral fellows,” Libby said. “In fact, GEPA has helped lead the nation in providing enhanced educational opportunities to ready trainees for the numerous careers available to the modern-day scientist. I am excited to be a part of this team. I look forward to further developing GEPA’s missions of providing world-class training for our graduate students and postdoctoral fellows, and to helping our trainees continue their important work focused on understanding human health and disease.”

Lord’s four-decade career in Rochester is dotted with milestones and accomplishments. She joined the School of Medicine and Dentistry faculty as a senior instructor in 1976 and rose through the ranks to professor in 1994. In 10 years as Senior Associate Dean, she worked to improve the experience of graduate students and postdocs in and outside the lab, adding Postdoctoral Affairs to the Office for Graduate Education’s name, standardizing salaries and benefits, and advocating on behalf of trainees. She spearheaded a revamping of the fundamental basic science courses, incorporating more workshops and active learning components and emphasizing team-based science. She also fostered professional development initiatives and guided efforts to support students’ health and wellbeing. Her return to the research lab will include focusing on an NIH grant to study the immune response in tumors.