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Equanimity

Equanimity

By Fred Marshall, MD

The other morning, as I was listening to the radio on my drive to work, the music was interrupted by an announcer with a stentorian tone: “Severe Storm Warning for Monroe and the Surrounding Counties.” In a matter of just a few more blocks, the weather transformed from docile to frantic. Trees were losing their branches, the wind was howling, leaves were swirling, and the rain was horizontal.

Mindful Practice: Community, Healing and the Long Journey of Medicine

Mindful Practice: Community, Healing and the Long Journey of Medicine

If you want to go fast, go alone

If you want to go far, go together

African Proverb

 

Our work in Medicine is not a sprint. It is more like a marathon. We know it requires discipline, commitment, intention, hard work, and stamina. But unlike running a marathon for individual reasons, it is a community activity. And in this time of the Olympics, as nations identify with their teams, our professional communities are similarly teams that provide opportunities for growth and fortitude, as well as for the transformation that is possible as we work through the crises that inevitably arise along the journey, the occasional or not so uncommon dark nights of the soul to borrow from a mystical source.

What's in a Name?

What's in a Name?

For many of us, amid the fears and uncertainties of the past year, the pandemic has been a time of reflection and re-integration of our life vision, purpose and meaning. The pandemic has brought many of us face to face with what really matters, and, for many of us, the things that mattered most before the pandemic matter even more now.

Mick Krasner and I, as founders of Mindful Practice®, have been going through a similar process, looking back at the evolution of ideas and programs that we’ve developed over the past twenty years, and looking toward the future.

Coming Out of Seclusion

Coming Out of Seclusion

This period of seclusion, isolation, and separation during the pandemic and the fears and anxieties that have arisen as a result highlight the lived experience that we are always stepping out of seclusion as we are at the same time always moving back into it. Now in some places, in particular the United States, we begin to move cautiously and joyously out of the physical seclusion and simultaneously back into the gifts, however clear or opaque they have been experienced, that the disruption of the pandemic has provided us, whether they be a clearer sense of the importance of connection, reflection and silence in our lives, or the uncomfortable realization of what it is to be, at some level, utterly and entirely alone.

Finding Resilience in the Community

Finding Resilience in the Community

I have been enjoying Spring in Rochester — the trees are flowering, the bulbs are blooming, and the birds are filling the air with their songs. It has been lovely to walk outside without a jacket on and feel the sunshine on my face. As I walk, I encounter people walking their dogs or gardening.

The hunger I have to be around people in community is palpable.

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