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I’m Getting Older…Am I Still Relevant?

I’m Getting Older…Am I Still Relevant?

Only you can make yourself unhappy. That is, perhaps, a non‐psychological layman’s interpretation of cognitive behavioral therapy, the concept that while you cannot control all of the slings and arrows the outside world throws at you that may make you question your worth, only you can control how you react to them.
The Little Book of Menopause; Essays on the Biology and Management of Menopause

The Little Book of Menopause; Essays on the Biology and Management of Menopause

The Little Book of Menopause; Essays on the Biology and Management of Menopause will address the role of inflammation as the underlying cause of most of the menopause symptoms, the biologic impact that loss of estrogen plays in this process and the role that hormone replacement serves to reduce these symptoms.

Menopause, Metabolism, and Visceral Fat Accumulation

Menopause, Metabolism, and Visceral Fat Accumulation

Our bodies, anthropologically, function solely to reproduce in order to preserve our species. But reproduction requires adequate metabolic energy. Witness the increase in body fat as one enters puberty or the negative effect on fertility for patients with anorexia nervosa, for those engaging in strenuous exercise, or those subjected to famine and starvation. Yet, as our ability to reproduce ceases at the other end of the age spectrum, we experience a reduction in metabolism, redistribution of fat to our abdominal area and, thus, the cardiovascular and diabetic risks of metabolic syndrome. The key to these interactions resides in our hypothalamus where reproduction and metabolism are controlled.

A Brief History Of Nonsurgical Treatments For Stress Urinary Incontinence

A Brief History Of Nonsurgical Treatments For Stress Urinary Incontinence

Stress urinary incontinence (SUI), which usually is related to pelvic organ prolapse (POP), is the involuntary leakage of urine with activity or straining such as when a woman is exercising, coughing, or even stepping off a curb. Estimates of 25% to 60% of women experience this over the course of their lifetime, and the numbers increase with increasing age.

Why Is Menopause Management Not Better Understood By OB/GYN Care Providers?

Why Is Menopause Management Not Better Understood By OB/GYN Care Providers?

Today, menopause management as a finite field of medicine is a product of many laboratory and clinical studies targeted at understanding the biology of menopause and the impact of hormonal and non-hormonal treatments. Why, then, do women in the menopausal transition or in menopause itself often confront a medical community that is either not aware of or is even indifferent to the challenges they face?