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Hair Today, Gone Tomorrow. What's Testosterone Got To Do With It?

Hair Today, Gone Tomorrow. What's Testosterone Got To Do With It?

For women in menopause, hair loss threatens one’s self-image and social confidence. Termed androgenic alopecia (AGA), or “female pattern hair loss,” it is misinterpreted as “going bald.” Even if a woman is reassured that this is not the case, or that it affects men as well, the phenomenon evokes fear and even depression.

Progress In Safety Of Hormone Delivery

Progress In Safety Of Hormone Delivery

Women depend on their reproductive hormones in many ways. During the reproductive years, estradiol, the most powerful of the estrogen family, is produced largely by the ovaries. While it is important for menstrual cycles and pregnancy, we now know that estradiol plays a key role in keeping your body in an uninflamed state. Estradiol accomplishes this by depressing the ability of your fat cells and immune cells to produce a number of inflammatory proteins that are linked to many of the menopausal symptoms women describe. Even in the several years leading up to that one year without a menstrual period (a window of time called the Menopause Transition), fluctuations in ovarian production of estradiol cause the release of these inflammatory proteins. These fluctuations explain why mood swings, hot flashes, skin changes, and loss of libido may be encountered, even as the menstrual periods still are occurring.

Does Estrogen Help Age Skin Better?

Does Estrogen Help Age Skin Better?

Our skin is not only our largest organ but also our protective shield and our most visible self. When Nora Ephron wrote I Feel Bad About My Neck And Other Thoughts About Being A Woman (2008), she was highlighting with humor, but compassion, the challenges women face as they age. And skin becomes a very visible part of that conversation. Why does our skin thin, and what causes wrinkles?

Panic Attack Or Generalized Anxiety Disorder?

Panic Attack Or Generalized Anxiety Disorder?

Your day has been unremarkable when suddenly you experience an overwhelming sense of dread. Your heart rate begins to increase, you break into a sweat, you cannot catch your breath, your chest tightens, and you feel dizzy. You wonder, “Is this a heart attack? Is this simply anxiety? Or, have I just experienced a panic attack?”

Do Women Need Their Own "Viagra"?

Do Women Need Their Own "Viagra"?

On June 5, 2015, U.S. news headlines proclaimed “FDA Panel Endorses Female Viagra.” This was inaccurate, because after two denials, it was only the advisory committee to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) who voted favorably to recommend that the FDA approve the drug Flibanserin® in August. The FDA wants more information on side effects of the drug, including dizziness, nausea, fatigue, insomnia, and the effects of alcohol. Flibanserin® is touted as a treatment for Hypoactive Sexual Desire Disorder (HSDD) for premenopausal women, which is defined as the persistent lack of sexual fantasies and desire that is distressful to the individual.  An estimated 10% of women experience this distress, which is why these headlines caught most people’s attention.