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URMC / Pathology & Laboratory Medicine / Education / Postdoctoral Research Fellowships

Postdoctoral Research Fellowships

Postdoctoral fellows are important contributors to the Department's research activities. Faculty are always looking for well-qualified individuals who can work independently on specific assignments and who have an interest in launching their own research careers.

Applicants need a Ph.D., M.D. or equivalent doctoral degree. Applicants who are not U.S. citizens or permanent residents will need a J-1 or an H1-B visa after they are offered a position. It generally takes 3-4 months to process visa applications.

Current openings are listed below. Faculty may be aware of unlisted opportunities in their area of expertise. Individuals looking for postdoctoral fellowship positions should review the list of faculty with their clinical and research interests.

See the Graduate Medical Education website for additional information on postdoctoral affairs and on available postdoctoral positions at the Medical Center.

Research: Bone Pathology

Applications are invited from suitably qualified individuals to study the role of NF-kappa B signaling in osteoclasts and osteoblasts and how cytokines induce bone loss and joint destruction in bone diseases, including postmenopausal osteoporosis, inflammatory arthritis and metastatic bone disease. Applicants should have experience in bone cell biology and in signal transduction by factors such as NF-kappa B. The fellow will further explore the role of these in bone cell function in normal and disease states and examine the efficacy of inhibitors NF-kappa B and other signaling pathways in vitro and in animal models of these bone diseases.
To Apply: Submit a current CV and names of referees by email to Dr. Brendan F. Boyce, Brendan_Boyce@urmc.rochester.edu 

Research: Leukemias

Postdoctoral positions are available immediately at the University of Rochester to investigate molecular mechanisms in acute myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndrome using the mouse as a model system. Our lab focuses on the zinc finger oncoprotein EVI1 and has developed a number of genetic models to investigate its function.
To Apply: Send a current CV and names of three references to Dr. Archibald S. Perkins, Archibald_Perkins@URMC.rochester.edu