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2017

New Issue of Opportunities to Explore – December 4-December 8, 2017

Friday, December 1, 2017

The latest issue of Opportunities to Explore is out!

We want your employer referrals! Let us know what employers you would like us to reach out to gain additional information about the company/organization, post internship and employment opportunities, and invite to campus for recruitment and interview events.

Free online webinar entitled How to Have a Great Interview! The webinar will help participants to develop the critical skills necessary to excel at an interview and provide a complete overview of the interview process, from preparation to execution, including often-used questions and answers.

New Issue of Opportunities to Explore – December 4-8, 2017

New Issue of Opportunities to Explore – November 27-December 1, 2017

Tuesday, November 28, 2017

The latest issue of Opportunities to Explore is out!

Deadline for the Teaching-as-Research (TAR) Fellowship and is Friday, December 1, 2017.

Check out the CPD’s Lending Library catalog to see free professional development books and resources you can sign out and utilize. To borrow a book, stop by our office in G-9627 or email us with your request.

New Issue of Opportunities to Explore – November 27-December 1, 2017

URMC Awarded Nearly $6 Million to Study Deadly Bone Infections

Monday, November 6, 2017

Bone infection, while relatively rare, can be debilitating and potentially fatal. In recent years, researchers in the Center for Musculoskeletal Research at the University of Rochester Medical Center have made several discoveries that position them to advance new treatments and possible cures for bone infections. Now, a nearly $6 million, 5 year award from the National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Disease at the National Institutes of Health, will allow the group to create a new multidisciplinary research program devoted to studying bone infections.

The CMSR has been among the top five NIH-funded orthopaedic research centers in the nation for over ten years, and Edward Schwarz, Ph.D., Burton Professor of Orthopaedics and director of the CMSR, has been the top NIH-funded orthopaedic researcher in the nation three years running. This new grant, awarded to Schwarz and throng of researchers from across the University of Rochester and beyond, brings the center’s total forecasted earnings for 2017 to $28 million.

Of the millions of Americans who have joint replacement surgeries each year, less than five percent come away with an infection. But this minority of patients must endure a long and difficult road to recovery, if they recover at all. The vast majority of these infections are caused by a bacteria called Staphylococcus aureus, including the dreaded methicillin-resistant strain (MRSA), which causes sepsis and death in 13 percent of infected patients.

Patients who survive these infections face multiple surgeries to remove infected tissue, months of strong antibiotic treatments, and a high likelihood of re-infection. For a long time, researchers have been working to understand how this bacteria evades treatment and Schwarz believes he has figured out.

Together with Karen Bentley, director of the Electron Microscopy Core at URMC, Schwarz showed that the bacteria can crawl deep into tiny channels in bones, possibly taking shelter there and later emerging to re-establish an infection. Though S. aureus was originally thought to be incapable of movement, Bentley and Schwarz, in collaboration with James McGrath, Ph.D., professor of Biomedical Engineering at URMC, and his spin-off company, SiMPore Inc., showed that this bacteria can migrate through tiny pores in membranes in the lab.

This new grant will allow Schwarz and Hani A. Awad, Ph.D., professor of Biomedical Engineering and Orthopaedics in the CMSR, to investigate exactly how S. aureus gets into bone and develop new treatments that target those mechanisms. Microbiologists Steven Gill, Ph.D., and Paul Dunman, Ph.D., in the Department of Microbiology and Immunology, will help the team develop new antibiotics to inhibit bone infection, which will be 3D printed into spacers that replace infected joint implants. Delivering the antibiotic at the site of infection may save patients’ limbs and lives.

Schwarz has also been working to understand what makes certain patients more susceptible to S. aureus infections than others, including why some patients recover relatively easily, while others die.

“Death following surgical site infection is not random,” said Schwarz. “By studying patient immune responses to this bacteria, we might be able to predict who will be fine and who will need extra medical attention.”

S. aureus can also become resistant to antibiotics, making it extremely deadly and difficult to eradicate. Better understanding patients’ immune reactions to the bacteria may provide new approaches to defeating it.

In an international study of more than 300 patients with infected total joint replacements, Schwarz and his team including John Daiss, Ph.D., and Chao Xie, M.D., in the CMSR, found that patients fared well if their immune systems attacked a certain S. aureus protein, and poorly if they attacked another. Patients who produced antibodies attacking autolysin, a protein important for cell division, were protected. Those who produced antibodies against a family of iron sensing determinant (Isd) proteins, which help S. aureus sap nutrients from its host, were more likely to experience sepsis and even die.

It is unclear why antibodies that attack Isd proteins are bad for patients, and Schwarz is determined to use this new funding to figure it out. He will also analyze the full complement of antibodies produced by patients infected with several types of staph bacteria to see if there are more good- and bad-cop antibodies that could help inform new treatments.

The Clinical Research Core of this program will be run by Stephen L. Kates, M.D., at Virginia Commonwealth University.

Read More: URMC Awarded Nearly $6 Million to Study Deadly Bone Infections

New Issue of Opportunities to Explore - October 30-November 3, 2017

Tuesday, October 31, 2017

The latest issue of Opportunities to Explore is out!

Interested in learning more about employment within industry? Kurt Schilling, PhD will be here to share his career story and discuss what he does as senior vice-president of Basic Research and Advanced Technologies at The Estée Launders Companies, Inc.

Applications are now open for the Teaching-as-Research (TAR) Fellowship and will be accepted until Friday, December 1, 2017.

Opportunities to Explore - Latest Issue

New Issue of Opportunities to Explore

Monday, October 23, 2017

The latest issue of Opportunities to Explore is out!

This week there are many career related resources including a CV writing workshop and a job search support group

Later on this month there are events about negotiation, health insurance for postdocs, and online and virtual career fairs. All this and more can be found inside!

Opportunities to Explore - Latest Issue

New Issue of Opportunities to Explore - October 16-20, 2017

Monday, October 16, 2017

The Week of Undergraduate research day is here! But before you get to that always awesome event on Friday, make sure you check out the other events happening this week and fill up your calendar with all the other things we have planned, by taking a look at the latest issue of Opportunities to Explore!

Opportunities to Explore - Latest Issue

Shares Receives Travel Awards

Thursday, October 12, 2017

Brianna Shares with her poster

Brianna Shares with her plenary poster in Denver, CO 

in September 2017

Brianna Shares, a second-year student in the Cell Biology of Disease Graduate Program, has received a $500 Young Investigator Travel Grant from the American Society for Bone and Mineral Research (ASBMR) for her plenary poster, “Improving Mitochondrial Function via CypD Genetic Deletion Promotes BMSC Osteogenicity and Fracture Repair.” The poster was presented in Denver, CO, Sept. 8-9, 2017.

Earlier this year, Shares received a $1,000 travel grant for the same project as part of Pathology Research Day 2017.

Latest Issue of Opportunities To Explore - September 4-8

Friday, September 1, 2017

The newest issue of opportunities to explore is now available, The newsletter contains information on events, resources, and more!

Highlight - Registration Closes Next Week

URBEST Retreat and Career Workshops  (Lunch Registration Deadline: Friday, September 8th)

Thursday, September 14 | 8:30 am - 4:00 pm | Class of 62 and CEL Classrooms, URMC

This year’s retreat includes guest presenter Randy Ribaudo from SciPhD joining us to present The Art of Negotiation and Networking for Success. Speakers and round-table leaders will be LeRon Nelson, Assistant Professor of Nursing; Ed Brydon, Social Media Strategist at Weill Cornell Medicine; Kirk Macolini, President & Principal Consultant at InteliSpark, LLC; Kurt Schilling, SVP Research and Technologies at The Estée Lauder Companies Inc.; and Judith Dunn, VP Global Head Clinical Development at Roche. There will be ice cream and therapy dogs at this year’s event also! Register for the event online at surveymonkey.com/r/17URBESTRetreat.

Register for URBEST Retreat and Career Workshop

Celebrating a Community of Diverse Students and Trainees at URMC (RSVP by Friday, September 8th)

Sunday, September 17 | 1:00 pm - 4:00 pm | Canal side Shelter Genesee Valley Park

Sponsored by URMC: Clinical and Transitional Science Institute, Executive Committee for Diversity and Inclusion, Office for Inclusion and Cultural Development, School of Medicine and Dentistry, and School of Nursing invite you and your families to join them for food, fun, and games, to celebrate our community of diverse students and trainees at the University of Rochester Medical Center.

RSVP for Celebrating a Community of Diverse Students and Trainees at URMC

Facebook Link to SMD GEPA Page

"Read More: Latest Issue of Opportunities To Explore - September 4-8

Video of 3 Minute Thesis Event

Thursday, June 8, 2017

We have the video of the full event with all presentations fully captions and with the slides running in time with the videos.

3MT Presenters, Programs & Topics

Thesis presentations in order

  • Stephanie Carpenter (Chemistry) - Solving the Mystery of Iron Chemistry
  • Sarah Catheline (Pathways of Human Disease) - Inhibiting Inflammaging to Treat Osteoarthritis(OA)
  • Scott Friedland (Genetics, Development & Stem Cells) - Pancreatic Cancer and the Tale of the Broken Librarian
  • Claire McCarthy (Toxicology) - Investigating the Toxicological Effects of Dung Biomass Smoke Exposure
  • Taylor Moon (Immunology, Microbiology and Virology) - The New Epidemic
  • Thuy-Vy Nguyen (Social-Personality Psychology) - Solitude *Winner*
  • Manisha Taya (Cellular & Molecular Pharmacology and Physiology) - Understanding Lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM): The “Other” Steroid-Dependent Cancer From Bed-Side to Bench and Back Again
  • Janelle Veazey (Immunology, Microbiology and Virology) - Role of Protein Kinase D in Epithelial Cells During Respiratory Infection

Full 3MT 2017 Event Video (CC)

Pathology Graduate Student Wins Travel Award for Research Project

Wednesday, May 31, 2017

Second-year Pathology graduate student Madison Doolittle won second place in the School of Medicine and Dentistry’s graduate student poster competition on May 17.

Madison DoolittleSecond-year Pathology graduate student Madison Doolittle won second place in the School of Medicine and Dentistry’s graduate student poster competition on May 17.

The annual event, hosted by the Graduate Student Society, includes entries from graduate students across disciplines as an opportunity to showcase their research in their respective fields.

Madison was the lead author the abstract titled, “Investigating the Role of Zbtb40 in the Genetic Regulation of Osteoporosis” in which he and fellow researchers examined the genetic determinants of bone mineral density used to diagnose osteoporosis.

He was awarded a $300 travel scholarship.

Catheline Awarded in Three-Minute Thesis Competition

Monday, May 15, 2017

Sarah CathelineCongratulations to Sarah Catheline for winning the People’s Choice Award at the University of Rochester’s Three Minute Thesis public competition held on May 11 at URMC.

Sarah is a fourth-year graduate student in the Pathways of Human Disease Ph.D. program and works in the lab of Dr. Jennifer Jonason. Her presentation, “Inhibiting Inflammaging to Treat Osteoarthritis (OA),” was one of eight to be accepted into the final round.

This year marks the second annual Three Minute Thesis public competition at the University of Rochester, which encourages participants to share their research in simple language that's both persuasive and easy for the average person to understand. 

The event is open to current Ph.D. and professional doctorate (research) candidates in or beyond their third year of study. It’s also open to postdoctoral researchers. Winners receive travel awards ranging from $250-750.

The event is sponsored by the School of Medicine and Dentistry Center for Professional Development, the School of Arts, Science and Engineering Graduate Studies Office, the Graduate Student Society, and Graduate Student Association.

Three Minute Thesis Awards: 

  • Judge’s Winner: Thuy-vy Nguyen (Runner Up: Scott Friedland)
  • People's Choice Award: Sarah Catheline 

Presentations: 

  • Stephanie Carpenter: Solving the Mystery of Iron Chemistry
  • Scott Friedland: Pancreatic Cancer and the Tale of the Broken Librarian
  • Sarah Catheline: Inhibiting Inflammaging to Treat Osteoarthritis (OA)?
  • Claire McCarthy: Investigating the Toxicological Effects of Dung Biomass Smoke Exposure
  • Taylor Moon: The New Epidemic
  • Thuy-vy Nguyen: Solitude
  • Manisha Taya: Understanding Lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM): The “Other” Steroid-Dependent Cancer From Bed-Side to Bench and Back Again
  • Janelle Veazey: Role of Protein Kinase D in Epithelial Cells During Respiratory Infection
     

Pathology Grad Students Present Results of CTSI Incubator

Wednesday, March 22, 2017

Christopher Farnsworth,  Ashlee MacDonald, and Eric Schott pose in  front of the podium at the Orthopaedic Research Society Meeting.Results from the 2015 CTSI Incubator project suggest there is a connection between gut microbes in obesity and impaired musculoskeletal health. Members of the Incubator project team presented results at the Orthopaedic Research Society (ORS) Annual Meeting this week that suggest manipulating the gut microbiome in obese animals can slow osteoarthritis and speed healing after fracture.

"Read More: Pathology Grad Students Present Results of CTSI Incubator