Skip to main content
Explore URMC

menu
Noyes Health / About Noyes / News / Article

Noyes Health Celebrates National Physical Therapy Month

Monday, October 27, 2014

Please join all of us at Noyes Health in wishing our Physical Therapy staff in Dansville and Geneseo a Happy National Physical Therapy month!   Staff includes Mike Donegan, PT, DPT, Marsha Wallace, PT, Paula Rocha, PT, Shelly Trim, PTA, Amy Jacoby, PTA, Dawn Johnston, PTA, Jessica Kershner, MSPT, Paul Kreher, MSPT, and our newest addition: John Russo, PT, DPT.  John just joined our team weeks ago and will sit for his boards at the end of October.  And, the friendly support staff includes: Charlotte Lincoln in Dansville and Linda Naples in Geneseo.

Physical Therapists treat a wide array of neuromuscular pathologies with exercise, manual therapy, modalities such as heat, traction, or ultrasound; and patient education.  In many cases, we help individuals avoid surgery, avoid or lessen long term medication use, return to work or sport, recover from surgery, and generally live a healthier life with less pain!

Physical Therapy started as a profession back in the early part of the last century.  The polio epidemic brought about the need for formalized muscle strength testing and re-education in 1916.  In 1917, as the U.S. entered WWI, the army recognized the need to rehabilitate wounded soldiers.  The Division of Special Hospitals and Physical Reconstruction developed 15 "reconstruction aide" training programs, and this later developed into the profession of Physical Therapy.  Today, there are over 204,000 licensed Physical Therapists in the U.S.   We are proud to say we have some of the best and brightest here at Noyes Health! Thank you to our Physical Therapy Team for your dedication to the profession and the community you serve.

7 Myths about Physical Therapy

People everywhere are experiencing the transformative effect physical therapy can have on their daily lives. In fact, as experts in the way the body moves, physical therapists help people of all ages and abilities reduce pain, improve or restore mobility, and stay active and fit throughout life. But there are some common misconceptions that often discourage people from visiting a physical therapist.

It's time to debunk 7 common myths about physical therapy:

1. Myth: I need a referral to see a physical therapist.

Fact: A recent survey by the American Physical Therapy Association (APTA) revealed 70% of people think a referral or prescription is required for evaluation by a physical therapist. However, all 50 states and the District of Columbia (DC) allow patients to be evaluated by a physical therapist without a physician's prior referral. In addition, 48 states and DC allow for some form of treatment or intervention without a physician referral or prescription (Oklahoma and Michigan being the exception). Beginning November 1, 2014, patients in Oklahoma will be able to seek treatment from a physical therapist without a physician referral. On January 1, 2015, patients in Michigan will be able to do so, as well. Some states have restrictions about the treatment a physical therapist can provide without a physician referral. Check out APTA's direct access summary chart (.pdf) to see the restrictions in your state.

2. Myth: Physical therapy is painful.

Fact: Physical therapists seek to minimize your pain and discomfort—including chronic or long-term pain. They work within your pain threshold to help you heal, and restore movement and function. The survey found that although 71% of people who have never visited a physical therapist think physical therapy is painful, that number significantly decreases among patients who have seen a physical therapist in the past year.

3. Myth: Physical therapy is only for injuries and accidents.

Fact: Physical therapists do a lot more than just stretch or strengthen weak muscles after an injury or surgery. They are skilled at evaluating and diagnosing potential problems before they lead to more serious injuries or disabling conditions—from carpal tunnel syndrome and frozen shoulder, to chronic headaches and lower back pain, to name a few.

4. Myth: Any health care professional can perform physical therapy.

Fact: Although 42% of consumers know that physical therapy can only be performed by a licensed physical therapist, 37% still believe other health care professionals can also administer physical therapy. Many physical therapists also pursue board certification in specific areas such as neurology, orthopedics, sports, or women’s health, for example.

5. Myth: Physical therapy isn't covered by insurance.

Fact: Most insurance policies cover some form of physical therapy. Beyond insurance coverage, physical therapy has proven to reduce costs by helping people avoid unnecessary imaging scans, surgery, or prescription drugs. Physical therapy can also lower costs by helping patients avoid falls or by addressing conditions before they become chronic.

6. Myth: Surgery is my only option.

Fact: In many cases, physical therapy has been shown to be as effective as surgery in treating a wide range of conditions—from rotator cuff tears and degenerative disk disease, to meniscal tears and some forms of knee osteoarthritis. Those who have recently seen a physical therapist know this to be true, with 79% believing physical therapy can provide an alternative to surgery.

7. Myth: I can do physical therapy myself.

Fact: Your participation is key to a successful treatment plan, but every patient still needs the expert care and guidance of a licensed physical therapist. Your therapist will leverage his or her specialized education, clinical expertise, and the latest available evidence to evaluate your needs and make a diagnosis before creating an individualized plan of care.

For more information on Noyes Health visit www.noyes-health.org, Noyes Health Facebook Page or contact Cynthia Oswald, PR/Marketing Director at coswald@noyes-hospital.org. or 585-335-4323.

Media Contact

Public Relations Department

(585) 275-3676

article hit counter