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Therapy: 101

Therapy: 101

Each of us experiences stress, depression, and anxiety in different ways. For individuals starting therapy, a therapist needs to thoroughly review their history, needs, and goals before determining an optimal treatment model, a few of which are introduced in this blog post.

5-4-3-2-1 Coping Technique for Anxiety

5-4-3-2-1 Coping Technique for Anxiety

Anxiety is something most of us have experienced at least once in our life. Public speaking, performance reviews, and new job responsibilities can cause even the calmest person to feel a little stressed. A five-step exercise can help during periods of anxiety or panic. Behavioral Health Partners is brought to you by Well-U, offering eligible individuals mental health services for stress, anxiety, and depression.

Struggling with Stress or Negative Thinking? There's an App for That

Struggling with Stress or Negative Thinking? There's an App for That

It comes as no surprise that today's resources are instantly available on smartphones to provide relief when feeling stressed, overwhelmed, or burnt out. Behavioral Health Partners, brought to you by Well-U, has created a list of free apps that promote mindfulness, Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT), and other evidence-based treatment models for managing symptoms of stress and anxiety. While apps can help in particularly stressful situations, it is important to remember that an app is not a substitute for professional assessment and treatment.

Reducing Stress during the Workday with Mindfulness

Reducing Stress during the Workday with Mindfulness

Have you ever been driving and realized you had stopped paying attention? It is not uncommon for us to go on autopilot throughout our day. Our attention frequently wanders to the past or future, while paying attention to the present may feel strange, uncomfortable, or even impossible.

Managing Anxiety in the Wake of Tragedy

Managing Anxiety in the Wake of Tragedy

Some experts worry that our non-stop exposure to tragedy in the news is taking its toll by causing undue, elevated anxiety for many of us. It is suggested that we can benefit by being more selective in how much information we allow ourselves to access. Though it is important to stay informed about the events of the world, it’s also just as important to know how to care for ourselves when it comes to things that provoke anxiety or pain, even when we are not directly affected. Learn more from Behavioral Health Partners’ October Blog Post. Behavioral Health Partners is part of Well-U, offering eligible individuals mental health services for stress, anxiety, and depression.

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