Skip to main content
Explore URMC

URMC Logo

menu

Grant Funding

Many of the University of Rochester Allergy, Immunology and Rheumatology faculty have active basic research grants that support innovative approaches to the study of the etiology and treatment of autoimmune diseases. In addition, some of these faculty conduct translational research linking clinical trials to their basic research.

Pathogenic Tissue Infiltrating T cells in CVI

Maria Slack, M.D.
The purpose of this project is to continue investigation into primary immunodeficiency, exploring the T cell defects in peripheral blood and target tissues in patients with CVID noninfectious complications. (6/1/18-5/31/20)

Regulation of the Nasal Transcriptome by House Dust Exposure

Maria Slack, M.D.
The overall goal of this project is to identify the respiratory immune responses altered by farm dust components in low risk populations to identify biomarkers for protection from allergic airway disease, directed early intervention and potential therapeutic trials. To date no studies have evaluated whether house dust exposure alters the nasal transcriptome of individuals in urban vs rural farming communities or identified which factors are associated with protection. (7/1/18-6/30/19)

Improving Care for Patients with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus at High Risk for Admission: The IQ-LUPUS Project (Improve Quality in Low-income, Underserved, Poor, Underage, SLE patients)

Allen Anandarajah, M.D., MSc
The purpose of this project is to improve health care for lupus patients by improving access to care and adherence to medication use, identifying and modifying behavioral and social impediments to on-going care and to provide an increased awareness of lupus in patients and the community. (7/2017-6/2020)

Bone Marrow IFN Beta and Mesenchymal Stromal Cells

R. John Looney, M.D.
The purpose of this research is to examine the expression and function of IFNβ in SLE patients. The investigators will characterize the regulation and unique functional properties of IFNβ in inducing MSC senescence and loss of immunosuppression function. In addition, the research will define the role of intracellular DNA/RNA sensing pathways in the induction of IFNβ in bone marrow and elucidate the effects of overexpression or silencing of key molecules in the signaling pathway including MAVS, STING, and cGAS on MSC IFNβ production. (1/1/2017-12/31/2018)

Rheum4Science: An Interactive Online Tutorial for Rheumatology Fellows

Bethany Marston, M.D.
The purpose of this research is to convert materials on basic science and clinical research methodology written by experts in the field to consistent, user-friendly, and relevant eLearning modules using best practices for web-based curricula and to evaluate the implementation of the Rheum4Science curriculum in practice using self-determination theory. In addition, the project will Initiate and evaluate the effects of a Rheum4Science social media discussion group. (7/1/2017-6/30/20)

Gastrointestinal Dysregulation and Systemic Inflammation in Common Variable Immune Deficiency

Maria Slack, M.D.
The purpose of this study is to investigate the IgA- and IgM-coated and uncoated microbiome and determine mucosal dysregulation and systemic immune activation in CVID. (1/1/2017-12/31/2017)

RO1 “DC-STAMP: Regulator of Osteoclastogenesis and Response Marker in PsA”

Christopher Ritchlin, M.D., MPH
In this grant, we will combine in vitro cellular and molecular, in vivo osteoimmunology, and translational strategies to address how DC-STAMP promotes OC genesis and inflammation, analyze if 1A2 inhibits synovitis and damage; and investigate if DC-STAMP is an early response biomarker in PsA. Results from these studies will provide insights into key mechanisms that underlie inflammatory arthritis and bone damage in the psoriatic joint and will catalyze biomarker discovery. Importantly, we expect our results will reveal therapeutic targets in the DC-STAMP signaling pathway with potential to impede pathologic bone degradation in PsA, osteoporosis and other inflammatory bone and joint disorders. (3/1/16-1/31/2021)

AMP “Accelerating Medicines Partnership in RA and SLE: Cellular Dynamics at the synovium-bone interface in RA”

Jennifer Anolik, M.D., Ph.D.
The purpose of this study is to better understand the interactions between B cells and T cells (types of white blood cells) and how this may affect joint destruction in patients with autoimmune diseases. The National Institutes of Health (NIH) is the funding agency for this study through the Accelerating Medicines Partnership (AMP) initiative. The AMP initiative is a collaboration between the NIH, biopharmaceutical companies, and non-profit organizations. The goal of AMP is to increase the number of new diagnostics and therapies for patients, and to reduce the time and cost of developing these new treatment options. The AMP Network for Rheumatoid Arthritis and Lupus is composed of various sites across the United States and the University of Rochester is a part of this network as a site. (9/24/2014-5/31/2019)

P01 (NIH/EMORY) “B cells in health and disease: Project 1: ‘Human transitional B cells: homeostasis and function”

Jennifer Anolik, M.D., Ph.D.
The purpose of this study is to better understand the interactions between B cells and T cells (types of white blood cells) and how this may affect joint destruction in patients with autoimmune diseases. The National Institutes of Health (NIH) is the funding agency for this study through the Accelerating Medicines Partnership (AMP) initiative. The AMP initiative is a collaboration between the NIH, biopharmaceutical companies, and non-profit organizations. The goal of AMP is to increase the number of new diagnostics and therapies for patients, and to reduce the time and cost of developing these new treatment options. The AMP Network for Rheumatoid Arthritis and Lupus is composed of various sites across the United States and the University of Rochester is a part of this network as a site. (9/24/2014-5/31/2019)

Karyopharm Therapeutics “Inhibition of nuclear transport in lupus-prone mice: modulation of renal inflammation and damage via depletion of auto-reactive antibody secreting cells”

Jennifer Anolik, M.D., Ph.D.
To develop a novel approach to the treatment of autoimmunity that targets the generation and survival of auto-reactive plasma cells (PCs) via inhibition of nuclear pore export (Selective Inhibition of Nuclear Pore Export=SINE), an approach being applied by Karyopharm Therapeutics to the treatment of hematologic malignancies, including the plasma cell cancer multiple myeloma. (3/1/2016-2/28/2017)

Medimmune Sponsored Research Agreement "B cell- T follicular helper cell interactions in Primary Sjogren's Syndrome"

Jennifer Anolik, M.D., Ph.D.
The purpose of this study is to look at specific white blood cells called T and B cells. T cells help protect your body against infections by secreting proteins that attract other types of white blood cells, called B cells, who can fight infections. In some autoimmune diseases, like PSS, T cells become defective and cause B cells to act differently than they normally would. (4/3/2014-3/31/18)

LCTC "Lupus Clinical Trials Consortium Network"

R. John Looney, M.D.
The purpose of this study is to learn more about lupus and how the disease is treated. The study will look at how your illness develops over time and will examine your symptoms and any damage that results from this disease over time. In addition, the study will look at treatments that are used for lupus and how people respond to various treatments and treatment combinations. The main goal of the study is to improve understanding of the lupus and its treatment. (1/30/2010-present)

U of R Rosenfeld Professorship

R. John Looney, M.D.
To develop a collaborative research program determining how the microbiome modulates the development of allergic, and autoimmune (systemic lupus erythematosus and psoriasis/psoriatic arthritis) disease. (06/2014-06/2019)